“The Lost Art Of Feeding Kids” by Jeannie Marshall.

I have been looking for reading some interesting and relaxing book for a while.  I am always interested in nutrition, healthy eating, super foods and so on, so this topic is always on the first place for me. When I am checking the books at the book store or at the library the first section I will look at is Healthy Habits, Eating.

When I saw the title of this book on the shelf the other day, I said to myself: ” This books is for me. I need to read it.” There are so many healthy eating books on the market, but 60% of them are boring, keep writing the same information, and makes you bored after 2 minutes reading it. So I was expecting a lot from ” The lost art of Feeding Kids”, and this book didn’t make me disappointed at all. The thoughts of the author is so close to me, because I was grown up in the same environment, so I could easily understand what she was talking about. My memories from the childhood are visits to farmers market every other day, especially in summer, homemade food and the fresh healthy food on the table. We’ve never had any frozen foods in our stores besides frozen fruits, we ate by season, no strawberries or watermelon in winter and we were much more healthier than the new generation now. I remember myself craving the fresh cucumbers by the end of  winter and my mom didn’t buy them in March or April explaining us they have a lot of pesticides in them and we should wait by summer time to eat the real fresh cucumbers. This was about all the foods: tomatoes, strawberries, watermelons, peaches. You need to wait for the season, when they are real and ripe and ready to eat.

The author takes us to Italy, so it was even more interesting for me to read the book because I like Italy and all about it.

Packaged snacks and junk foods are displacing natural, home-cooked meals throughout the world—even in Italy, a place we tend to associate with a healthy Mediterranean diet. Italian children traditionally sat at the table with the adults and ate everything from anchovies to artichokes. Parents passed a love of seasonal, regional foods down to their children, and this generational appreciation of good food turned Italy into the world culinary capital we’ve come to know today.

When Jeannie Marshall moved from Canada to Rome, she found the healthy food culture she expected. However, she was also amazed to find processed foods aggressively advertised and junk food on every corner. While determined to raise her son on a traditional Italian diet, Marshall sets out to discover how even a food tradition as entrenched as Italy’s can be greatly eroded or even lost in a single generation. She takes readers on a journey through the processed-food and marketing industries that are re-manufacturing our children’s diets, while also celebrating the pleasures of real food as she walks us through Roman street markets, gathering local ingredients from farmers and butchers.

At once an exploration of the US food industry’s global reach and a story of finding the best way to feed her child, The Lost Art of Feeding Kids examines not only the role that big food companies play in forming children’s tastes, and the impact that has on their health, but also how parents and communities can push back to create a culture that puts our kids’ health and happiness ahead of the interests of the food industry.

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The Lost Art of Feeding Kids: What Italy Taught Me about Why Children Need Real Food

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